Bulgur Wheat Pilaf - Dalia Pulao





Sunday mornings....we woke up with the delicious aroma coming from the kitchen as Mom cooked our favorite breakfast. At my home, back in India, one of the staple dish in the Sunday's breakfast menu is "Dalia" or Bulgar Wheat, along with poori-bhaji or stuffed paranthas.
The fragrance that filled the entire house while mom slow roasts the raw "dalia" was just unforgettable. And the final product that was laid out on the dining table was just out of this world - rich, creamy and aromatic "sweet dalia," cooked in fresh whole milk, the nutty crunch of green pistachios, the sweet-subtle aroma of freshly crushed cardamoms and above all its sweet. Yes! I have a sweet tooth and I can't stop myself from having few bowls at one sitting. It's not only me, we are a sweet tooth family, so mostly it is the sweet dalia that we love to eat for breakfast. Though it can be cooked sweet as well savory, more like veggie pilaf




Dalia or Bulgur wheat, sometimes also called cracked wheat (not parboiled), is rich in fiber and protein, has a lower glycemic index, and higher levels of most vitamins and minerals.

This super-beneficial Indian breakfast, not only keeps the digestive system healthy, it also is an ideal food for people wanting to lose weight or those with high cholesterol levels.

Dr Josh Axe has beautifully explained all the pros and cons of this versatile grain -
Bulgur Wheat: The Better Wheat for Your Belly - Dr. Axe
 
Cracked wheat (Dalia) is made by milling raw wheat berries into smaller pieces.
Bulgar wheat is pre-cooked; wheatberries are parboiled, dried and then broken into small pieces.
Both are whole wheat grains, and have identical health benefits.
Cracked wheat is made by milling raw wheat berries into smaller pieces, a process that reduces cooking time but still preserves the nutrient- and fiber-rich bran and germ layers. Bulgur is pre-cooked: wheatberries are parboiled, dried then broken into pieces.

In this blog post of mine, I'll be sharing the recipe of "Bulgar Pilaf" or savory Dalia, that I almost make every other morning for breakfast. 


Since I've always seen my Mom dry roasting dalia before cooking, and yea, even today she does the roasting part just before cooking dalia, I on the other hand, do this roasting part in bulk, good for two weeks....voila
Here comes the recipe for Bulgar wheat 🌾 pilaf or Savory Dalia
 
Serves 4
Preparation time: 15 minutes Cooking time: about 20 minutes

350 gr/ 12 oz/ 2 cups of coarse organic bulgur, wheat, rinsed and drained OR coarse organic cracked wheat(dalia), dry roasted
2 medium onions, finely chopped
1-2 carrots, diced
4-5 Asparagus stems, cut into length size pieces
A handful of green peas
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 tablespoons butter(optional)
400 gr /14 oz can of chopped tomatoes
600 ml / 1 pint / 2 1/2 cup hot vegetable or chicken stock or plain water
1 teaspoon salt – please adjust to your taste –
1/4 teaspoon paprika/red chili powder(add more if you love spicy 🌶 food)
1/4 teaspoon turmeric powder
freshly ground black pepper
chopped parsley for garnish – optional-

Using Bulgar wheat - Rinse the bulgur under cold running water, drain and set a side.
OR
Using Cracked wheat(dalia) - Dry roast the cracked wheat till the color turns brown and your kitchen is filled with beautiful aroma of roasting wheat... a rustic feel

Sauté the chopped onions in olive oil and butter until soft. Add the carrots, green peas, asparagus and chopped tomatoes, cook for another minute. Add paprika(red chili 🌶) and turmeric powder. Sauté for a minute. Add the stock (or water) and bring to boil.

Add the bulgur(or dalia), salt and ground pepper and stir once. Cover and cook over a low heat until the bulgur has absorbed all the stock and stem holes are visible on the surface. It is important not to stir the pilaf during this time. Remove the pan from the heat. Cover the pan with a cloth or absorbent kitchen paper and the lid over the top. The bulgur will continue cooking in the steam and the cloth will absorb any excess moisture. Leave to stand covered, for at least 15 minutes before serving.







Anshu Bhatnagar

1 comment:

  1. Thank you so much for helping me balance my diet and everyone else's here at home! Your blog has been very useful

    ReplyDelete

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